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Stunning hybrids from Toyota, Porsche

POSTED BY Nigel Andretti ON 03 October 2016

TOYOTA introduced the C-HR—or Coupe High-Rider—crossover at the ongoing Paris Motor Show.

Fitted with the latest-generation hybrid power plant, the C-HR generates CO2 emissions as low as 82 g/km, with combined-cycle fuel consumption of only 3.5 l/100 km.

Delivering 122 hp, this new hybrid powertrain is not only more efficient and lighter than the previous system, but also offers sharper performance.

Detailed design changes to the gasoline engine have resulted in a thermal efficiency of 40%. Other hybrid system components have been made lighter and smaller, and have been repositioned for optimum packaging, further contributing to the car’s low center of gravity.

The C-HR is also available with a new 1.2 liter turbo engine, which debuted in the Auris. Delivering 116 hp and 185 N·m of torque, this unit generates CO2 emissions as low as 125 g/km and returns combined fuel consumption from 5.4 l/100 km. It may be mated to either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a Continuously Variable Transmission. CVT equipped versions are available with either front- or all-wheel drive.

The design and development of the Toyota C-HR chassis received the full attention of the Chief Engineer Hiroyuki Koba, himself a keen driver.

“I have noticed, for example, that Europeans have a much more fluid driving style, based on a more acute observation of traffic. They avoid obstacles simply by adapting their trajectory and speed and will focus to carry on speed aiming for efficient progress, while elsewhere in the world the preferred approach is very often to stop. This has prompted us to work with our European team on driving precision in all aspects of the vehicle. We wanted to achieve performance on a par with a good C-segment hatchback,” he said.

The Toyota C-HR remains true to the general features of the concept-cars introduced in Paris in 2014 and in Frankfurt in 2015. Its coupe-like lines are a testimony to the resolve of its designers to create a style that stands out in the Toyota range, and to establish a new direction amongst mid-sized crossovers.

The Toyota C-HR’s unique character demonstrates the flexibility that the TNGA (Toyota New Global Architecture) gives to vehicle developers in the three key areas of design, powertrain and dynamics, enabling them to deliver a new and fresh take on the increasingly commoditized crossover segment.

PORSCHE unveiled the new Panamera 4 E-Hybrid plug-in hybrid (earlier post)—the fourth model in the Panamera line—at the Paris Motor Show.

pana

The vehicle generates some 462 h) of system power and delivers fuel consumption figures of 2.5 l/100 km in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) for plug-in hybrid models, with up to 50 km (31 miles) all-electric range. That corresponds to CO2 emissions of 56 g/km. Energy consumption is 15.9 kWh/100 km.

The new Porsche plug-in hybrid always starts in purely electric mode and drives without generating any local emissions within a range of around 50 kilometers and a maximum speed of 140 km/h. The all-wheel Porsche achieves a top speed of 278 km/h and delivers a system torque of 700 N·m from stationary without hesitation.

The four-door hybrid sports car breaks the 100 km/h barrier in just 4.6 seconds. The torque is transferred to all four wheels and the standard three-chamber air suspension ensures an optimum balance between comfort and dynamism at all times.

As with the 918 Spyder, the power of the Panamera electric motor 136 hp and 400 N·m torque is available as soon as the driver touches the accelerator pedal. On the predecessor model, the pedal needed to be pressed at least 80 percent of the way down to unleash the additional power of the electric drive. Now, the electric motor and gasoline engine interact in harmony from the beginning.

Like with the 918 Spyder, the electric motor is available to deliver additional power at all times. This, together with the performance characteristics of the new 2.9-liter V6 biturbo engine (330 hp/450 N·m), generates an impressive boost scenario based on electric motor and turbochargers.

In the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid, the electrical energy is also used to increase the car’s top speed. Porsche sees this new type of “E-Performance” as the performance kit of the future.

Together with the V6 gasoline engine decoupler, the electric motor heralds the new generation of the Porsche hybrid module. In contrast to the electro-hydraulic system of the predecessor model, the decoupler on the new Panamera is actuated electromechanically by an electric clutch actuator (ECA), resulting in even shorter response times.

As on the other second-generation Panamera models, a new, extremely fast and efficient-shifting Porsche eight-speed Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission is used to transmit the power to the all-wheel drive. This transmission replaces the eight-speed automatic torque converter transmission on the predecessor model.

The electric motor is supplied with power via a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery. And despite the fact that the energy content of the battery (which is integrated under the luggage compartment floor) has been increased from 9.4 to 14.1 kWh, its weight has remained the same.

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